Get Kids Out Learning

This year we’re teaming up with the ‘Get Kids Out Learning’ campaign to encouraging more families to drop the smartphone, step away from the laptop and head outside to create learning experiences, memorable for years to come.

We believe that learning continues outside of the classroom, especially during half term.  So, why not join us for a range of family friendly events and workshops this October half term. We’ll have the Mysterious Creature craft table, a Living History performance of No Bed of RosesFrom the Caribbean to Manchester,   and Make Your Mark: Animal graffiti mural.

Mr Ordinary's Prize Book Launch 08 07 12 (40)

If you’d like to support the campaign and Get your Kids Out Learning here’s how to get involved:

The Get Kids Out Learning campaign is an easy way for families to find fun days out local to them, but which still provide great learning and educational opportunities for the kids. The website pulls together all of the best educational venues across the UK and allows parents to search for them by region to quickly see all the information they need to plan a great day out!

Find attracts in your local area by visiting the Get Kids Out Learning site.

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PHM at Manchester Pride

A guest blog by Jenny White, a Community Curator for our Never Going Underground  exhibition

If you’re watching Manchester Pride Parade on Saturday give us a wave. Staff and volunteers from People’s History Museum are out on the streets serving LGBT+ heritage realness.

The Never Going Underground exhibition has a number of items exploring Pride’s journey from political activism to a corporate sponsor’s dream. Leaflets, banners and photos highlight ongoing issues around diversity, accessibility, and inclusion; and contrasting attitudes to police and the armed forces taking part in parades. We also bagged an interview with Peter Tatchell who as a member of the Gay Liberation Front helped organise the first London pride back in 1972.

LGBT+ people are drawn from wildly different backgrounds and there can be a real clash of aims and priorities over Pride season. 

1979 Wages Due Lesbian leaflet

How Gay is Gay? flyer, LSE Library’s collections

This Wages Due Lesbians leaflet from 1979 questions who Gay Pride and the ‘gay’ scene is for. It’s a question still very relevant today with racism, sexism and transphobia very much alive and kicking within LGBT+ communities. Over the past few months activist Chardine Taylor Stone has continued to challenge the programming of blackface artists at LGBT+ prides across the country. It’s fantastic that this year there has finally been a positive outcome to Rainbow Noir’s call for Manchester Pride to be a Queens of Pop free zone.

knitted pluses

Also on display in the Never Going Underground exhibition are a set of @aceknitaholic’s craftivist pluses. They’re used to yarnbomb community stalls at Pride events that miss the ‘+’ from LGBT+ and to start a dialogue with stall holders to promote inclusion and recognition of other sexual and gender minorities outside the ‘LGBT’ spectrum.

There are photos and flyers from the first Peckham Pride organised in 2016 by Movement for Justice and Lesbians and Gays Support the Migrants. We recorded an interview with one of the organisers, Karen Doyle, who tells us about the aim to promote solidarity between LGBT+ people and migrants, and to celebrate local resistance against immigration raids and detention centres.

We’ve a Campbell’s soup costume which was worn at London Pride 2008. Activists were calling for a boycott of Heinz products after the firm pulled a gay themed advert instead of holding their ground against complaints.

Everyone has an opinion on the involvement of big business in Pride. Some people hate corporations using rainbow imagery and messages about ‘freedom’ to market goods. Others think it’s no bad thing that big corporations are spreading tolerance, making LGBT employees feel valued, and making a positive contribution – Asda’s LGBT network for example organises family friendly areas at a number of Prides. Personally I think if it annoys the bigots it must be doing some good:

homophobes starving

Each summer disgruntled cisgender heterosexuals take to social media asking ‘why do the gays need pride?’, ‘why can’t we have a straight pride?’. But it’s a no brainer.

Vile homophobic and transphobic attacks in Manchester are still all too common. In February I gave a talk at an LGBT+ History Month event in Bournemouth, where Christian activists sat in on the whole day’s talks in protest at us spreading gay propaganda. Last year a teaching assistant successfully took legal action against her school after they criticised her for expressing homophobic views to pupils. Conservative activists are currently voicing opposition to updating the humiliating and outdated process transgender people currently have to undergo to change their legal gender. A spokesperson for Grassroots Conservatives labelled transgender people “deeply troubled”, and compared gender dysphoria with anorexia “it’s not actually respectful or loving to affirm that person in a belief that is false, that doesn’t tie up with reality.” Meanwhile in July a Labour councillor branded gay pride marchers paedophiles.

Pride is a celebration of difference, an opportunity to confront homophobia, bi-phobia transphobia, as well as a chance to party. 

If you haven’t checked out the Heritage Lottery Funded Never Going Underground exhibition, get your skates on – the final day is Sunday 3 September.

Fighting for Justice Together: Peter Roscoe and Geoff Hardy

Both individually and as a couple Geoff and Peter have been tirelessly fighting for equal rights and against injustices.  Their activism first brought them together on a bus in London in 1978. Peter was travelling to an Anti-Nazi League meeting and was wearing a ‘Gays Against Fascism’ badge. Geoff, a teacher, was travelling to a parents’ meeting. Geoff went up to Peter and said, ‘I like your badge and I like you!’. Serendipitously, they met again during a march against the National Front, but again lost contact. In 1980, Geoff and Peter finally reunited when they met at The Castle, a gay pub in Lewisham.  They have been together ever since, and in 2005, they were the first couple in Shropshire to obtain a Civil Partnership.

newspaper cover Geoff and Pete

Peter and Geoff’s activism continued in their professional lives as well. As a teacher, Geoff was active in the Gay Teachers Group and helped with the first publication of the Schools Out book. Peter worked as a Social Worker at a gay counselling organisation and went on to practise law. The couple have also worked on numerous committees such as the London Lesbian and Gay Centre and Gay Rights Working Party. Together Peter and Geoff helped establish the Shropshire Rainbow Film Festival, now in its 11th year.

In honour of our current changing exhibition Never Going Underground: The Fight for LGBT+ Rights exhibition, the couple has generously shared a few items from their involvement in past campaigns. The items document the decades of activism and involvement in the LGBT+ movement. Examples include badges from previous campaigns such as for Gay Liberation Front, Campaign for Homosexual Equality, Safe Aging No Discrimination, and Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners.

Peter and Geoff's badgesToday Peter and Geoff continue their political involvement. They are retired and involved with ‘Back in Time’: The National Festival of LGBT History/Shrewsbury Hub, Shropshire Rainbow Film Festival, and FRESh (Fairness, Respect, Equality Shropshire). They celebrated their 37th anniversary on 23 March 2017.

Firing to the Extreme!

A guest blog by Charlie Manthorp, a third year Three Dimensional Design student studying at Manchester Metropolitan University and the Cultural Digital Designer in Residence at St Ambrose Barlow Roman Catholic High School.

In February 2017, St Ambrose Barlow Roman Catholic High School got to work on their ‘Firing to the Extreme’ project with help from art students attending Manchester Metropolitan University and of course,  The People’s History Museum.

Firing to the Extreme 1

This artistic project involved creating pots out of clay and including quotes on them to highlight right extremism. The project was helped along by the students’ visit to the People’s History Museum, where they learned all about the struggles for democracy and movements for freedom and justice. The students were able to put their new-found knowledge and inspiration into their innovative project.

Firing to the Extreme 4

The day was immensely enjoyed by these students by the sound of their feedback:

‘I loved my experience at the PHM. I feel it demonstrated the importance of British Values and Extremism. I feel this trip will contribute a lot to my project. I would love to attend again’

‘Visited the PHM today! Was sick. #neverlearnedsomuch’

 ‘Today was awesome @PHM I loved the live drama and all of the activities. The other exhibits also showed a lot about what is going on in our world these days’

‘I had an amazing day and would love to come again and learn more’

Firing to the Extreme 2

Needless to say, the students enjoyed getting started on working with the clay almost as much as they enjoyed their visit to PHM! 

Firing to the Extreme 3

Visit our Learning webpage to learn about planning a school visits.

Black Radical History

The museum is delighted to continue to work with the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) to host a series of courses in autumn 2016. You can find out more about the Black Radical History course in our guest blog from WEA tutor Mark Krantz, who is leading the course.

7-14-october-2016-black-radical-history-wea-course-peoples-history-museum-tuc-anti-racist-march-liverpool-photograph-mark-krantz

For Black History Month, a course to explore how Black radicals have made history. From opposition to slavery and the battle for the vote, to the fight against racism and Islamophobia, and the question of supporting refugees today. The course includes a presentation from Ahmed Iqbal Ullah Race Relations Resource Centre and a visit to the PHM’s archives and galleries.

The uprising of slaves on the sugar island of Saint-Domingue began in 1791 and lasted for 13 years. A slave army led by Toussaint-Louverture defeated the professional armies sent to crush the revolt. Spain, France and Britain were defeated and the slaves won their freedom in the country known today as Haiti.

William Cuffay was a Chartist leader at the forefront of the struggle to win the vote in Britain. Cuffay was the son of a former slave, he led strikes, spoke at meetings, and led protests of mainly white workers across the country.

When Abraham Lincoln declared the abolition of slavery during the American Civil War, 30 former slaves who had escaped to Britain spoke at meetings in the Manchester area. They played a crucial role in winning workers to support the union struggle that defeated the army of the slave holding states of the Southern Confederacy.

Too often the role of black people in the struggles for their own liberation is omitted from history. This course places black radicals at the centre of historical change, exploring the history and politics of race, and strategies for fighting racism.

7-14-october-2016-black-radical-history-wea-course-peoples-history-museum-migrants-make-the-nhs-anti-racist-day-march-photograph-mark-krantz

This course will cover

  • Opposition to slavery, and the American Civil War
  • William Cuffay and the fight for the vote
  • Racism and anti racism from the 1970s until today
  • Rebel women from Farhat Khan, and Lydia Besong, to Manjeet Kaur and Aderonke Apata
  • The challenge of Islamophobia, stereotyping, and the Prevent agenda

Suitable for people aged 19 years and over

Course runs Friday 7 October to Friday 4 November 2016

1.00pm – 3.30pm

Cost £40.30 or free to those in receipt of means tested benefits

Booking Requirements: Booking required by contacting WEA on 0151 243 5340 or booking online via WEA’s website. Please quote course ref C3839448

*Please note this is a five week course, attendees are required to book onto all five weeks of the course*

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Zombie Capitalism and its discontents: The economics and politics of austerity

The museum is delighted to continue to work with the Workers’ Educational Association (WEA) to host a series of courses in autumn 2016. You can find out more about the Zombie Capitalism and its discontents course in our guest blog from WEA tutor Mark Krantz, who is leading the course.

26-september-3-october-zombie-capitalism-and-its-discontents-the-economics-and-politics-of-austerity-wea-course-peoples-history-museum-photograph-mark-krantzSince the economic crash of 2008 austerity has been imposed on the people by politicians and bankers.  Today the need for austerity is being challenged.  This course will examine various explanations of economic crises, as well as the impact of austerity on people and politics today.

Faced with the financial crisis that began in 2007, some commentators talked of the dangers of ‘zombie banks’.  Too many financial institutions had lent money they did not have, to people who could never pay them back.  This led to the ‘banking crisis’.  As the banks got bailed out, their debts were taken over by nation states, which in order to balance their books, brought in harsh cuts and an economic policy of austerity.  With no signs of an end to the economic crisis, increasingly people are challenging the assumption that austerity is necessary.  Some economists are predicting even more economic uncertainty, others a long recession or even another crash.

This course will study:

  • Previous economic crises, and the crisis today
  • The impact of austerity on the people and on politics
  • We will consider competing economic theories; from Neoliberalism to Keynesianism, Marxism to Corbynomics, as well as current theories of economic inequality
  • Look at current protest movements, the political and electoral consequences of austerity, as well as alternative economic futures.

Suitable for people aged 19 years and over

Course runs Mon 26 September to Mon 5 December (half term break on Mon 24 October), 1.00pm – 3.00pm

Cost £65.10 or free to those in receipt of means tested benefits

Booking Requirements: Booking required by contacting WEA on 0151 243 5340 or booking online via WEA’s website. Please quote course ref C3839453

*Please note this is a ten week course, attendees are required to book onto all ten weeks of the course*